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How Broccoli Grows Easily in The Home Garden

If you’re looking for an easy way to add nutrient-rich broccoli to your home garden, look no further.

Broccoli is a versatile vegetable that can be eaten fresh, lightly sautéed or used in stir fry, soup and pasta or rice-based entrees. Here’s how to grow broccoli in your garden.

If you love broccoli, you’ll be happy to know that it’s easy to grow in your home garden. Just follow a few simple tips and you’ll be enjoying fresh broccoli from your garden in no time!

How to Grow Broccoli

As a rule of thumb, broccoli seeds germinate within 4 to 7 days when ambient temperatures remain between 45- and 85-degrees F. (7 to 29 C.). For a fall crop, broccoli can be direct seeded into the garden in midsummer.

If you want to harvest broccoli plants in midsummer, start indoors 6 to 8 weeks before the last frost date. You can sow the seeds ¼ to ½ inch (6 to 13 mm.) deep in a quality seed-starting mix or soil pellets. This is an easy way for any home cook to grow broccoli in their home garden.

Broccoli Growing Tips

Broccoli is a cool-season vegetable that can be grown in most parts of the country. Be sure to provide plenty of light to prevent leggy plants. When it’s time to transplant your seedlings outdoors, be sure to give them plenty of room to grow; broccoli plants can get quite large.

Water broccoli regularly and feed it with a balanced fertilizer once a week (compost tea works well for me). You should be able to harvest broccoli heads about 60 days after transplanting.

Broccoli is one of the easiest vegetables to grow in your home garden. Wait until frost-free weather arrives before transplanting broccoli seedlings into the garden. Be sure to harden plants off by gradually exposing them to outdoor conditions for a week before transplanting. Space plants 18 inches apart in the garden and water regularly. Broccoli is ready to harvest when the buds are firm and tight.

Broccoli is a rich source of vitamins C, A, and K, as well as dietary fiber. It also contains cancer-fighting compounds called glucosin.

If you want to grow broccoli in your home garden, be sure to provide plenty of space between plants. This will encourage larger central heads. Broccoli prefers full sun, so choose a location that provides at least 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight each day. Broccoli also prefers a slightly acidic soil pH of 6 to 7, so be sure to test your soil before planting. With a little bit of care, you can be enjoying fresh broccoli from your garden in no time!

Broccoli is a cool weather crop that can be planted in late summer or early fall. It does best in a soil that is rich in organic matter and well-drained. Fertilize the plants with a balanced fertilizer, as too much nitrogen can promote excessive leaf growth. If you live in a warmer climate, you can also plant broccoli in the spring. Be sure to water regularly, especially when the plants are young. With a little bit of care, you can enjoy fresh broccoli from your own garden!

It’s often a good idea to add potassium and phosphorus to the soil. These nutrients will help encourage bloom development, so your plants will be productive. Water regularly, keeping the soil moist but not soggy; broccoli grows best in moist conditions. With a little bit of care, you’ll be able to grow broccoli in your own garden!

Mulch is a gardener’s best friend, and it’s especially helpful when growing broccoli. Mulch helps to control weeds and retain soil moisture levels, which is important for keeping broccoli healthy.

To prevent disease and control pests, it’s best to plant broccoli in an area of the garden where you haven’t grown similar from the crops from the same family for four years. If you plan to   use a row cover, make sure to put it on early enough in the season to protect transplants from cold spells, pests, birds and deer. With a little bit of effort, you can easily grow broccoli in your home garden!

Harvesting Broccoli Plants

The edible part of the plant is the unopened flower, and the central head should be harvested when it’s fully developed but before the individual buds open into small, yellow flowers. Broccoli is a great choice for home gardeners because it’s easy to grow.

If you’re looking to harvest broccoli to your garden, be on the lookout for tight heads with big, dense flower buds. If the buds begin to open, pick them right away – it’s too late to pick if the plant has bolted. Keep an eye on your veggies and you’ll know when it’s time to harvest them.

Broccoli is a cool-weather crop that can be grown in most parts of the country. To harvest, use a sharp knife to remove the central flower head. Leaving the broccoli plant in the ground encourages side shoots (flower heads) to develop. Although smaller than the central head, these side shoots allow gardeners to continue harvesting broccoli for a longer period.

Depending on what area you live in, you can also grow broccoli in your garden by planting it in late summer or early fall. By planting it this way, you will be able to harvest broccoli from your garden all winter long. Unfortunately, I’m in south-central British Columbia, Canada so winter growing outdoors just isn’t a reality.

Broccoli is a great vegetable to grow in your home garden because it is easy to grow and it is a nutrient-rich vegetable. Broccoli is a good source of vitamin C, vitamin A, and dietary fiber. It is also a good source of potassium, magnesium, and calcium.

Conclusion

Broccoli is a great vegetable to add to your diet. It’s packed with nutrients, including vitamins C, A and K, as well as fiber and potassium. And it’s easy to grow – just harvest during the cool, morning hours and refrigerate as soon as possible. Unwashed broccoli heads can be stored in the refrigerator for 3 to 5 days. Blanched broccoli freezes well and maintains its quality for up to 12 months. So, if you are looking for a quick and easy way to add broccoli to your diet, growing it in your own garden is the way to go!

Read more about the top-rated nutritious benefits of eating cruciferous vegetables like broccoli: A Beginner’s Guide To Cruciferous Vegetables

 

A Beginner’s Guide To Loving Cruciferous Vegetables

The health benefits of kale, arugula, and Brussels sprouts are well-documented.

They’re all delicious cruciferous vegetables and pack a nutritional punch. A diet rich in these veggies can help reduce your risk of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease while boosting immunity to colds or flu. Here are some tips for incorporating more nutritious and delicious cruciferous vegetables into your cooking at home:

-Eat them raw as crudités with dips like hummus or guacamole.
-Use them as sandwich fillings instead of lettuce or tomato slices.
-Add them to pasta, soups, stews, or braised dishes for a nutrient boost without changing the flavor too much.
-Include them in your favorite salad recipes.
-Steam or roast them for a quick and healthy side dish.
-Freeze them for later use in smoothies, soups, or stews.
-Experiment with new recipes featuring cruciferous vegetables and discover your new favorites.
-Include kale, arugula, and Brussels sprouts in your next grocery list, and start cooking up some delicious and nutritious meals today!
-Kale is a great addition to smoothies or juices for an antioxidant boost.
-Arugula makes a delicious addition to pizzas, sandwiches, and salads.
-Brussels sprouts are perfect roasted with a bit of olive oil and salt. Experiment with different seasonings for a variety of flavors.
-All cruciferous vegetables are high in fiber which can help regulate digestion.
-They’re also a good source of vitamin C, vitamin K and important minerals like potassium and manganese, fiber, and antioxidants.

Looking to improve your health and cook with cruciferous vegetables? Here are some tips to help you out!

-Cruciferous veggies are a diverse group that includes broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, bok choy, arugula, Brussels sprouts, collards, watercress, and radishes.
-Many of these vegetables can be steamed or boiled in just a few minutes for a quick and healthy side dish.
-For something a little more adventurous, try stir-frying them with some garlic and ginger for an Asian-inspired dish.
-Cruciferous vegetables are a great addition to any diet!

The Sign Of The Cross

The name “cruciferous” is an informal classification for members of the mustard family and comes from the Latin cruciferae meaning “cross bearing,” because the four petals resemble a cross.

Home cooks are often looking for ways to eat healthier, cook more creatively, and reduce their grocery bills. Whether you’ve just started cooking or you’re an experienced chef, these tips will help you get the most out of your cruciferous vegetables.

Crucifers are one of the healthiest food groups around— not only do they contain cancer-fighting properties (like glucosinolates), but some also have anti-inflammatory effects that can help reduce the risk of heart disease and other chronic conditions.

-There are many ways to cook crucifers, so be sure to try out a few different recipes to find your favorites. Roasting brings out the sweetness of these vegetables while steaming preserves their nutrients.
-Cruciferous vegetables are also a great way to save money on groceries. They are often cheaper than other vegetables, and they can be used in a variety of dishes.

If you’re looking for a way to improve your health, consider cooking with these particular cruciferous vegetables.

These veggies are packed with nutrients and can help reduce inflammation and the risk of cancer. They’re also low in calories and high in fiber, making them a great choice for those looking to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight.
Cruciferous vegetables come in all different colors, shapes, and sizes, so there’s sure to be one that you’ll love. Below, are some of my favorites.

It doesn’t take much to reap the benefits. Adults need at least 2½ cups of vegetables a day. One cup of raw and cooked veggies, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts, is equivalent to a 1-cup vegetable serving. Two cups of raw leafy vegetables, such as kale and bok choy, are the equivalent of a 1-cup vegetable serving.

I have a confession. I used to be one of those people who turned their nose up at cruciferous vegetables, like broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Why? Because I didn’t know how to cook them!

But when you learn the basics (and it’s not hard), you can start adding these nutritious veggies into your diet in a delicious way that will keep you healthy as well as satisfied. Here are four simple tips for cooking with cruciferous vegetables:

-Choose organic whenever possible
-Cut off the tough ends and discard any wilted leaves
-Steam or boil until tender, but don’t overcook
-Add butter, olive oil, garlic, or other herbs like thyme or rosemary for flavor
These tips will help you get started but don’t stop there! There are plenty of other cruciferous vegetables to explore, so get cooking and enjoy the health benefits.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is indeed delicious in many ways beyond steaming. Try roasting florets or “steaks” of cauliflower to release its pleasant flavor, pureeing it into a sauce for pasta, and more!

Check out these 4 creative ideas:

1) Mash it up for a pizza crust;
2) Substitute it for rice;
3) Grate it into croutons or pickles;
4) Roast the florets or “steaks” to release its pleasant flavor.

In addition to being tasty, cruciferous vegetables like cauliflower are also very healthy. They can help protect you from cancer and other diseases by combating oxidative stress on the cellular level.

Brussels Sprouts

Want to cook healthier for your family? You can start by cooking with vegetables like Brussels sprouts. These cruciferous veggies are packed with vitamin C and beta-carotene, which boost immunity. They also contain other nutrients that help your body fight cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.

Here’s a recipe to get you started:
-Brussels Sprouts in the Oven Recipe: *Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C) *Remove outer leaves from sprouts and cut in half lengthwise; remove any brown spots or tough stems.
-Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper; spread out evenly so they’re not touching each other but still close together.
-Drizzle with olive oil and balsamic vinegar.
-Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and your choice of dried fruit, nuts, diced garlic, and/or shredded Parmesan cheese. Bake for 18 to 20 minutes, stirring once during cooking, and serve immediately.

Kale

The almighty kale is a wonderful green for salads. Remove the tough stem, slice into thin ribbons and toss with toppings, dressing and all. Best of all, this hearty green will not wilt for days, making it a great option for packing ahead.

To balance the bitter bite, pair it with something sweet such as roasted carrots, diced apple or dried fruit. Kale also is a great addition to smoothies and can even be baked into crisp chips.

Kale is a green leafy vegetable in the Brassica oleracea family, grown for its edible leaves. Kale plant leaves are often used in salads, or as a cooked leaf vegetable. The word kale comes from Old English and means “cole” (cabbage) and “beet”. It is of the same genus as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower and collard greens.

Kale offers many health benefits such as being rich in vitamin C, A & K; containing high levels of calcium; possessing anti-inflammatory properties; preventing cancer by reducing cell damage to tissues through antioxidant activity; lowering cholesterol levels when included with other vegetables that contain fiber like carrots or apples and assisting digestion.

In addition to being healthy, cruciferous vegetables are also delicious. They add a rich flavor and satisfying crunch to salads, sandwiches, and side dishes. And best of all, they’re easy to prepare. Here are four tips for cooking with cruciferous vegetables:
1) Remove the tough stem from kale before slicing into thin ribbons.
2) Toss kale with toppings, dressing and all. It won’t wilt for days, making it a great option for packing ahead.
3) To balance the bitter bite, pair kale with something sweet such as roasted carrots, diced apple or dried fruit.
4) Kale also is a great addition to smoothies and can even be baked into crisp chips.

Arugula

Did you know that arugula is one of the easiest greens to grow in your garden or in a planter? Arugula is a spicy leaf that can be pureed into a pesto with a kick, tossed onto whole-wheat pizza once it emerges from the oven or used in a variety of tossed salads. For a classic combination try fresh arugula paired with feta cheese, cubed watermelon, and a balsamic dressing.

We want to help home cooks improve their health by cooking with cruciferous vegetables like arugula.

Here are four bullet points on how to do just that:

1. Start by adding simple recipes like our Arugula Pesto recipe to your weekly meal plan.
2. Use a variety of cruciferous vegetables in your recipes like arugula, broccoli, cauliflower and kale.
3. Experiment with different cooking methods like roasting, steaming or sautéing to bring out the best flavor and nutrients in these vegetables.
4. Make sure to include at least one serving of cruciferous vegetables in your daily diet for optimum health benefits.

Conclusion

The bottom line is this: for the sake of your overall health and taste buds, adding a variety of cruciferous vegetables to your daily meals is an absolute no-brainer. There’s a huge range of tastes, flavors, and textures to enjoy so get cooking!

Metabolic Greens + Review

5 Reasons To Nourish Your Body With METABOLIC GREENS Plus…

METABOLIC GREENS Plus is an all-natural, premium quality blend by Purehealth Research that contains five revitalizing health-boosting superfood blends. It has 34 potent ingredients bursting with easy-to-digest nourishment for your body that helps support multiple levels of good health.

For the sake of complete honesty, as of writing this, I’m now in my second month of drinking Metabolic Greens every day so part of this review is a look at what the product contains and what it can possibly do for your health when consumed daily according to its makers, and part is my own anecdotal observations from approximately 45 days of personal use.

What is Metabolic Greens Plus?

Metabolic Greens Plus from Pure Health Research is a low-calorie, high protein greens powder formula. As outlined on the company website, it claims to nourish the body while boosting your metabolism and digestion with a combination of five different superfood blends .

On a personal level, three specific benefits I’ve noted after more than a month of daily use are greatly increased energy levels for daily life and specifically for my workouts. A noticeable lack of in between meal hunger sweet tooth cravings and most delightful is a lowering of fat on the waistline that I haven’t been able to burn off previously with just workouts alone.

It’s a potential solution for those who struggle with stubborn belly fat. A sluggish metabolism leads to an accumulation of fatty tissue around your midsection, especially if you are aging or living unhealthy lifestyle choices such as poor diet and excessive stress levels throughout everyday life.

The Metabolic Greens Plus formula is a natural way to flush out toxins and boost metabolic processes. It can help promote overall higher levels of health which in turn can help us avoid conditions like high blood pressure, type-2 diabetes, as well weight gain by cleaning up your act from within.

It has a proprietary blend of ingredients designed to improve your overall health without delivering any negative side effects. Consequently, users can possibly eliminate excess fat layers that have resisted workouts and diets while experiencing all the health benefits associated with this amazing supplement.

How Metabolic Greens Plus Works

Eating a healthy diet can be challenging; especially as we hit middle age and beyond. Most north Americans are at least a little overweight. Many are obese and our diets and sedentary lifestyles are often to blame.

To be overweight is to court danger. The farther your body mass index (BMI) falls into an unhealthy range, the greater your risk of heart disease and diabetes among other negative health conditions.

With its natural ingredients, Pure Health’s Metabolic Greens Plus formula is an effective and safe way to support better health. It works by helping to flush toxins out of your body, helping to improve digestion and by boosting your metabolism leading to increased energy levels.

1). Detoxify Your Body

Metabolic Greens Plus helps to eliminate toxins in the body which are accumulated due to pollution and junk food. The user will notice an improvement on his/her health once these impurities have been eliminated by using it regularly over multiple months.

2). Help improve digestion

With a formula that flushes out toxins and supports digestive processes, it can help you increase energy and potentially lose weight more effectively.

3). May increase metabolism

Metabolic Greens Plus is a great way to speed up your body’s metabolic processes and to boost energy levels

The Metabolic Greens Plus List of Ingredients

The Metabolic Greens Plus formula is a supplement that offers 5 distinct blends of ingredients to support your bodies level of health. This review highlights key ingredients from each blend, helping users better understand the benefits.

The supplement facts panel on Metabolic Greens Plus doesn’t list amounts of the ingredients, but it does say that each serving contains the following.

1). The Greens Blend

This blend contains a host of vitamins and minerals that provide your body with the nutrients it needs to stay healthy. Thanks in part from alfalfa extract, wheatgrass, spirulina and broccoli it has an antioxidant effect helping combat free radicals which can potentially lead to health problems such as premature aging or even certain types of cancer.

Wheatgrass is a natural way to help prevent or at least manage diabetes and obesity. Studies show that it can reduce blood sugar levels, cholesterol level or both.

Broccoli, that most wonderful and well-used of all cruciferous vegetables is not just a great source of Vitamin C, but also contains antioxidant effects that can help prevent cancer. The fiber in this vegetable may reduce food cravings and appetite.

The active ingredient in green tea, caffeine is known to boost your metabolism and support weight loss. A study found that 200mg of caffeine combined with daily exercise improved BMI and waist-to hip ratio.

2). Reds Blend

The reds blend includes Beetroot extract, Black Currant, Blueberry Concentrate, Pomegranate Extract, and Raspberry Extract.

Black currants are an antioxidant fruit that can be found in Asia and Europe. They’re used to help support weight loss, improve blood flow for better metabolism of carbohydrates throughout the body.

Pomegranates provide fiber and vitamins while also delivering minerals such as iron or zinc that may promote healthy blood flow like black currants do!

3). Metabolic Blend

The metabolic blend includes Cinnamon Bark Extract, Ginger Root Extract, Bitter Melon, Black Pepper Extract, and White Tea Extract.

Ginger has been used in food preparation and traditional medicine for centuries. It provides anti-inflammatory effects, improves energy metabolism (which helps you feel happier!), as well weight loss benefits!

Research has shown that Cinnamon bark is a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. It’s purported ability to control blood sugar levels among other disease fighting benefits make it worth consideration by researchers, doctors or anyone who values their health.

The spice cinnamon has been used to treat obesity because it can balance blood sugar levels. One study found that doses from 120mg/d – 6g per day for more than 1-4 months lowered fasting glucose secretion in overweight women with Type 2 diabetes or high triglycerides without any side effects.

Turmeric is a spice that can be found in this blend. It delivers different proposed health benefits, mostly related to curcumin which was once thought of as just an orange pigment but now we know it’s actually a powerful anti-inflammatory produced by turmeric plants.

4). Probiotic Blend

Probiotics are gut-friendly bacteria that support digestion and general health. They do not cause harmful infections. For example, L. acidophilus is usually included in probiotic blends because of its ability to boost immunity, relieve stomach discomfort, and support healthy digestion.

Probiotics are important for digestive health. They can help with things like relieving stomach discomfort, boosting immunity and supporting the body’s natural ability to digest food more efficiently!

Likewise, B. bifidium strains are included in many dietary supplements for their anti-inflammatory, immune, and anti-allergy capabilities.

5). Enzyme Blend

The enzymes in this product are designed to help your body absorb all the nutrients. The digestive process starts when salivary glands produce amylase, which helps break down carbs into simple sugars that can be easily used by other parts or cells within our bodies

Simply put, this means you get more energy and better health.

This means you get more energy and better health!

What Are The Benefits of Using Metabolic Greens Plus

The manufacturer recommends taking one scoop with 8oz of water 30 minutes before meals each day for best results.

These are Benefits of taking the Metabolic Greens Plus formula as advised:

  • Promotes a more efficient and healthier metabolism
  • Helps the body detox by flushing out the bad stuff
  • Helps reduce your appetite and those cravings for the sweet stuff
  • Help your system burn off calories and excess fat
  • Noticeable boost to you energy level
  • Its ingredient list is science backed

Metabolic Greens Plus is a vegan-friendly supplement that promises to give you the benefits of green smoothies without any unpleasant taste or texture. It’s gluten free, non-GMO and does not contain additives so it should be safe for most people.

Does Metabolic Greens Plus Have Any Drawbacks?

Metabolic Greens Plus formula is a highly rated natural health product that will do much to improve the overall health of most of us. However, there are a couple of points to be aware of.

It’s only available online and not at your local big box store or mum and pop health food shop.

Results vary for individuals but, the same can be said for most other health products.

It’s not recommended for children and pregnant or breastfeeding women.

Is Metabolic Greens Plus Safe For You?

The creators of this supplement assure users that its ingredients are like other greens powders on the market, but with one notable exception: they use ingredients found naturally in food rather than synthetic ones.

Metabolic Greens Plus includes everything needed to boost metabolism and improve your overall health but does it in a natural, easy to absorb way.

Metabolic Greens Plus – Where to Buy

Interested buyers may purchase Metabolic Greens Plus from the official website at https://getmetabolicgreens.com/. It is important that they visit this site to get a genuine product and avoid any possible frauds or scams associated with third party sellers on Amazon, Ebay etc…

The manufacturer guarantees safe delivery of your order through their proprietary shipping channel which provides tracking information on all shipments—this way you know exactly when it will arrive!

The product comes with a money back guarantee, so you can buy it without any worries. Plus there are offers and discounts only available from the website! A single bottle of this supplement lasts one month when used according to instructions.

Metabolic Greens Plus comes with a one-year moneyback guarantee, which alleviates the financial risk for users. They have up to 1 year after purchasing their product before deciding if it’s right for them and can return within this period without any questions asked!

Metabolic Greens Plus – Yes or No?

The ingredients in Metabolic Greens Plus are all natural and of the highest quality. It provides a variety of wonderful benefits for your overall health.

Bottom line, it’s remarkably easy, quick, and convenient to get all the good stuff in one easy-to-digest supplement that gives you so many different health benefits in one place. With this product I’ve found myself feeling full much quicker and experiencing better sleeping patterns. My energy levels are considerably higher over the last 45 days of using it and my workouts are much more enjoyable and effective. I’m fitter, lighter and more energetic.

As a result of all the good changes to my health, I will continue to use and enjoy Metabolic Greens Plus every day.

 

 

Affiliate Disclosure:

 

The links contained in this product review may result in a small commission if you opt to purchase the product recommended at no additional cost to you.

Turnips vs Rutabagas – Which One Should You Choose?

Turnips vs Rutabagas – Which One Should You Choose?

Which vegetable comes out on top when looking at turnips vs rutabagas?

Is there a large nutritional difference between them and are they prepared and used the same regardless of whether they are used raw in salads or cooked in any number of ways.

Turnips, also known as white turnips, are grown for their fleshy taproot while rutabagas are similar in shape but contain a slightly yellowish flesh that goes a darker shade when cooked.

Turnips and rutabagas are closely related, but turnip is actually a poor term for the vegetable we know as rutabaga. Rutabagas resemble turnips only in that both root vegetables have turniplike leaves, rough skin, and white flesh. The turnip’s flesh is white while the rutabaga’s flesh turns light yellow when cooked. Rutabagas are also known as Swedish turnips or neeps by the British (especially in Scotland).

The turnip is a cold-season vegetable, grown for its fleshy root and leaves. The root can vary in size from that of a turnip to that of a large radish and may turn green in the presence of sunlight. Turnips can be cultivated like radishes and turnips.

The turnip is known in many English-speaking countries as rutabaga, which comes from the Swedish dialectal word rotabaga, meaning “root bag” or “swede turnip”. This came from the turnip’s resemblance to a small bag or purse. In parts of Britain, the rutabaga is actually called Swede and it’s used in a variety of “turnip” recipes.

The fruit of the turnip is smaller than that of the rutabaga, which can grow up to one pound (500 g) and more, but turnip roots are usually eaten when they are still much smaller than rutabaga. Rutabagas can also be harvested when they are still quite small and turnip-like. There is even a variety of turnip popularly known as King Size that produces turnip up to 3 pounds (1.5 kg) at the expense of somewhat smaller roots than those of standard varieties.

Most turnips have white flesh, but there is a purple-turnip known as purple top white globe turnip or purple top turnip, which has become popular in recent years. Purple coloration is the result of natural pigments called anthocyanins, similar to those found in blackberries and red cabbage. Anthocyanins are water-soluble, so blanching turnip greens removes much of the color.

There are also golden turnips with yellow flesh, some turnip varieties turn white when cooked, while others turn yellow. If not overcooked, turnip roots have a pleasantly crisp texture. Turnips are commonly used as an ingredient in soups and stews or boiled and mashed like potatoes.

The turnip is rich in Vitamin C and moderate in sugar, containing more sugar than potatoes (white turnips contain twice the amount of sugar as white potatoes).

Turnip leaves are an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin K, folic acid, calcium, iron, and fiber. Rutabagas are bigger, plumper, and denser than white turnips. They have yellow flesh instead of white because they are related to cabbage rather than turnips. Rutabagas contain vitamin C, and E, potassium, magnesium, calcium and fibre. Rutabagas are usually peeled before cooking, but turnips don’t need to be peeled if small or young. Rutabagas can be mashed like potatoes, roasted alone or with other root vegetables or steamed and served as a side dish. They can also be a substitute for turnips in soup or stews.

Nutritionally, turnips and rutabagas are similar, but turnip roots contain more carbohydrates while turnip greens have more calcium than rutabaga leaves.

Top five facts turnips vs rutabagas:
– turnips vs rutabagas: similar but different in many ways
– turnip is a poor term for the vegetable we know as rutabaga
– turnips are cultivated like radishes .
– they can be harvested when they are still quite small and turnip-like.
– turnip greens have more calcium than rutabagas

Click here for more information on what to do with turnips

What To Do With Turnips

What To Do With Turnips?

In North America, the turnip isn’t as well known as it is in other parts of the world.

I think it’s time for that to change.

The humble and highly affordable turnip is a wonderfully tasty and nutritious cruciferous vegetable that’s begging to be better understood and utilized to add variety and great taste to our meals.

What Are Turnips And How Do I Use Them?

The turnip is classed as a root vegetable. It belongs to the Brassica family. Brussel sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli are the other prominent members. Turnips tend to be round in appearance. Often the tops turn a purple hue where it’s exposed to sunlight as it grows and matures. The turnip is known for crisp white flesh that has a taste somewhere between a cabbage and a radish.

In the southern United States, braised turnip greens are often served in a similar style to mustard greens with a flavor that’s also familiar.

A Turnip By Another Name

In some parts of Britain as well as parts of Canada, a turnip is also used for a rutabaga which is a similar member of the Brassica Family but has a mild-tasting yellow flesh.

When Are Turnips in Season?

Although turnips are available in stores most of the year, the harvest season for turnips is generally late fall or early winter depending on the location and variety. Turnips prefer mild temperatures and will grow reliably in many environments all over the world.

What Do Turnips Taste Like – Raw vs Cooked?

I fully admit I love turnips. Both raw and cooked in a variety of ways. The thing is, the turnip, just like several other veggies, changes its flavor profile slightly when cooked in certain ways. Turnips are mild but flavorful when raw but depending on the cooking method, the taste changes to sweeter and/or nuttier.

A turnip’s texture goes from firm and crisp (perfect for eating raw with a sprinkling of good sea salt) to smooth and velvety after cooking. This cruciferous vegetable lends itself to all kinds of raw and cooked techniques. We’ll get to that next.

7 Creative Ways to Cook With Turnips

A general rule of thumb is to use turnips the same as other root vegetables such as beets, sweet potatoes or even (depending on the recipe) carrots. When buying turnips, go for ones that look and feel firm and heavy. Most times, at least in Canada, the leaves are removed but if you do find leafy turnips, go for ones that are leaf’s that are bright and healthy looking.

  1. Turnips lend themselves to dishes that require cutting vegetables to a common size for frying or braising. They compliment others such as carrots, celery, leeks and onions.
  2. Another personal favorite turnip preparation is pickled. The turnips texture and flavor perfectly suited for pickling and it’s easy to do at home. Submerge turnips pieces in a vinegar brine and keep in your fridge. These flavor treats are the perfect compliment for sandwiches, burgers, charcuterie board etc.
  3. Try turnips fried to go with eggs instead of potatoes. The other option is to mix equal amounts turnips and spuds. I suggest cutting them to the desired size, then pop into boiling water for 5 to six minutes. Drain, let dry then fry up the mix for the eggs. Sprinkle liberally with sea salt and pepper and enjoy the unique flavor.
  4. Turnips lend themselves well to salads. Thin slices of turnip (use a grater or mandolin) are perfect in all kinds of salads. You can use baby turnips whole or pickled and whole on your cheese and meat boards.
  5. Try making a turnip and potato gratin. Turnips keep their texture and nutty flavor better than the spuds giving a much more enjoyable texture to the gratin.
  6. Steaming is a great way to cook turnips for a quick side dish. Steam till fork tender then toss with butter and sea salt. Turnip’s natural sweetness is preserved by steaming. Just don’t overcook.
  7. Turnips can make a brilliant mash for roasts and bbq dinners. Another of my favorites is “Dirty Mashed Potatoes.” Cube up potatoes, carrots, and turnips (dice carrots and turnips smaller than potatoes so they all cook at same rate). Cook to fork tender then mash all together with cream, sea salt and fresh ground pepper. Then add ½ cup of grated parmesan cheese and finish with sliced spring onion for texture. I have also been known to add caramelized dice onions to the mash as well. Put your judgements on hold and try this recipe. I think you’ll soon be like me and find regular mashed potatoes just a tad boring after trying it.

Why You Must Roast Turnips

Roasted and caramelized, turnips are sweet, nutty, and delicious. It’s something you really should try. Either just turnips or add them to a mixture of root veggies for a brilliant side dish.

  1. Peel and trim you turnips.
  2. Cut the turnips into a fairly uniform size (same for other vegetables if you’re mixing). Sprinkle with salt, pepper and whatever extra seasoning you like.
  3. Place all the veggies on a baking tray then pop into a 400 F oven to cook till tender. Flip them once or twice during roasting to get even caramelization.

Enjoy!

If you’d like more information on why cruciferous vegetables are a great choice for almost anyone’s diet then click here to see why

 

What’s The Nutritional Value of Broccoli – 1 Cup Equals Excellent Nutrition

What’s The Nutritional Value of Broccoli – One Cup Equals Excellent Nutrition

One of the most popular of all the cruciferous vegetables is broccoli.

It’s a vegetable that even many kids like to eat both raw with a dip or cooked pretty much any way you like. I know mine did when they were young so for obvious reasons, I fed it to them regularly.

It’s also high on my list of most nutritious and delicious vegetable sides that’s readily available at any grocery store and super easy to prepare.

To back up the nutritional claims let’s look at exactly what you’re getting in one cup of raw broccoli

Broccoli 1 Cup – Nutrition Facts

My thanks to the USDA for supplying the following nutritional data on the nutritional value of 1 cup of raw broccoli.
Calories: 31
Fat: 0.3g
Sodium: 30mg
Carbohydrates: 6g
Fiber: 2.4g
Sugars: 1.5g
Protein: 2.5g
Carbs

That one cup of raw broccoli contains a paltry 31 calories, only six grams of carbohydrates, and a measly 1.5 grams of sugar. As for the 6 grams of carbs, over one third of them come from fiber. Simply put, broccoli is a densely nutritious, heart smart cruciferous vegetable that almost everyone should be enjoying regularly.

The glycemic index (GI) is an estimate of how a particular food can affect your blood sugar levels. Broccoli rates a 10 making it a low GI food that has only a small effect on blood sugar levels.

Fat

Broccoli contains just a trace of fat and it’s 100% cholesterol free. Also on the upside, it also gives you a small dose of omega-3-fatty acids. It comes in the form of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Eating two cups of broccoli flowers gives you almost .5 grams of this good-for-you fatty acid.

Is There Protein In Broccoli?

Broccoli contains two and a half grams of vegetable protein per our one cup measurement. A good amount in vegetable form but, you will likely want to include other sources of protein to ensure getting enough in your diet.

Vitamins and Minerals

Broccoli is not only delicious, it’s packed full of important vitamins and minerals. One cup of raw broccoli provides 135% (81mg) of your daily vitamin C intake. It also gives you an excellent source of vitamin K ( (vital for healthy bones and wound healing). That one cup gives you 116% of your daily intake. In addition, broccoli is a good source of vitamin B and A along with potassium, other B vitamins and manganese. In short, it’s a nourishment powerhouse!

Does Broccoli Have Health Benefits? – Yes And They’re Plentiful!

Weight Loss

Because broccoli is rich in nutrients but extremely low in calories, it’s a perfect addition to diets of those of us looking to lose weight. One cup of broccoli gives us 9% of our daily fiber intake. Fiber is important in lowering cholesterol and promoting healthy bowels and blood sugar levels. Both are extremely important components of losing excess weight. Because of its high fiber content, eating broccoli can help you feel full for longer thereby lowering your appetite.

Other health benefits are associated with high fiber diets like the considerably lower risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes.

Improved Heart Health

Multiple medical studies have demonstrated a higher consumption of cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli does excellent things for your heart. Lowering your risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke are the main benefits but there are many.

Can It Lower Your Risk of Cancer?

Broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables rate highly when it comes to cancer prevention. Numerous studies have linked their regular consumption with helping to prevent prostate, lung and breast cancers. The high fiber content helps in the fight against colon cancer.

Cell Protection

Broccoli also comes with high levels of antioxidants. These antioxidants help prevent cell damage that can lead to inflammation in our bodies by fighting off free radicals that can cause such damage.

Allergies and Broccoli

Broccoli as a rule is not a vegetable prone to causing humans problems with allergies. In some rare cases, certain individuals who suffer from hay fever due to mugwort pollen have been documented having a mild case of tingling lips and/or tongue. In extremely rare cases a swollen throat or anaphylaxis can result, but it has to be said, those cases are extremely rare.

Does Broccoli Have Any Adverse Effects?

As mentioned, broccoli has a large amount of Vitamin K and if a person eats large quantities or makes sudden changes in how much you eat AND you’re taking certain blood thinners, the change in Vitamin K can affect the thinning mechanism of the drug. To be safe, Vitamin K intake should be consistent. Again, this is extremely rare but to be sure, seek the advice of a qualified medical or nutritional professional before making any changes in diet.

Broccoli Varieties

Broccoli comes in many different varieties but it’s doubtful you’ll be seeing them all at your local grocery store. The standard broccoli varieties seen in North American grocery stores are Calabrese, Destiny and Belstar. These can be identified by their thick stalks and bright green flowers.

There’s a variety called Romanesco that’s occasionally seen at the grocery stores. It’s recognizable by its yellowish color and pointy flowers.

You are least likely to find varieties like Romanesco broccoli, which has pointy florets and a greenish-yellowish color. Delicious and easy to use like the more regular broccoli varieties, it doesn’t store or sell as well so will not see it as often.

Another personal favorite of mine is Broccoli Raab. It’s delicious although it can be a tad bitter and not for everybody. Technically speaking, raab is actually a member of the turnip family and not broccoli but that really doesn’t matter.

What’s The Best Time Of The Year To Eat Broccoli?

As anyone who shops knows, broccoli is usually available all year long even though its natural growing cycle is October to April. Just in case it does stop being available all year, the good news is frozen broccoli is just as nutritious as fresh so eat and enjoy.

When buying broccoli, choose the tight flowered, dark green bunches with a firm green stalk. Try to pass on the bunches with soft flowers or stalks. Yellowish flowers mean it’s going bad so try to avoid.

Storage and Food Safety

Storing broccoli means keeping it in the fridge crisper. It will last for a few days but try to use it in short time and keep it dry as much as possible until cooking time.

Broccoli can be frozen, just blanch or steam it briefly before freezing. Cook for 2-3 minutes before plunging into ice cold water to stop it cooking. Freeze in airtight bags for up to a year.

Broccoli is edible pretty much from flower to stem. Just trim off the woody outer layer of the stalk before cooking. Eating the stalks raw is one of my favorites. Cut off the outer layer, slice thinly and sprinkle with good quality sea salt and enjoy. Try it. I’ll bet you’ll love it.

It’s been said by some that broccoli can smell off and that means it’s gone bad. Fortunately, that’s not the case.
Broccoli has substances known as glucosinolates that contain sulfur smelling chemicals. These chemicals (naturally occurring – not introduced) give broccoli its distinctive aroma.

Preparing Broccoli

Broccoli is as equally tasty when washed, cut up and eaten raw in salads or coleslaw as it is steamed, sautéed or roasted. The point being it’s easily adaptable to whatever you want to do with it and tastes great regardless.

When cooking broccoli, be sure not to overcook it. It’s the one definite way to turn it tasteless, soft and unappealing. Overcooking also diminishes the nutrient value so try to avoid that.

For perfect steamed broccoli every time, simply steam the raw broccoli cut in whatever fashion you prefer for four minutes keeping the lid on the whole time. After the four minutes, your broccoli will be a vibrant green color and will have perfect crunch but be cooked enough to enjoy. Any bitterness will be removed by this process.

Another excellent way to enjoy broccoli is to toss it in olive oil, sea salt and fresh-ground pepper and roast it at 400 degrees for 20-25 minutes. For something extra, add fresh garlic and diced jalapeno to the mix for great flavor and just a bit of background heat. Delicious!

Click Here For A Description of What Are Cruciferous Vegetables – Here’s The List

What Are Cruciferous Vegetables? Here’s The List

What Are Cruciferous Vegetables? Here’s The List


Spinach, arugula, broccoli and Brussels sprouts are all popular, delicious, versatile, nutrient-packed vegetables. Beyond that, there’s another common thread that ties them all together that you might not know anything about.

Those names plus many others are all on a list of vegetables known as cruciferous (see below for a full list of all cruciferous vegetables).

The name “cruciferous” comes from Latin meaning “cross bearing” because of their four petaled flower resembling an X on top or sideways.

Cruciferous vegetables certainly do not look similar. They come in a large variety of shapes, sizes, and colors. What they happen to have in common is being packed with minerals, vitamins and nutrients that have huge health benefits to those of us consuming them.

Nutrients such as folate Vitamin A, C and K are all present and available. The dark, leafy green vegetables also contain plant-based phytonutrients that are known to lower inflammation in our bodies and help protect us against certain types of cancer.

All cruciferous vegetables are high in fiber and low in calories. Winners all round.

A huge benefit of eating regular meals and snacks containing cruciferous vegetables is you don’t have to eat pounds and pounds of it to get the full benefits. Adults should be eating at least 2.5 cups of vegetables every day. For raw leafy greens such as spinach or kale, a 1.5 cup serving is equal to 1 cup of vegetables consumed whereas for measuring the harder members such as broccoli and cauliflower, one cup is a cup.

My suggestion based on real life is don’t get too carried away with the measurements. Just enjoy as much as you can every day. You’ll soon start to see and feel the benefits.

If putting more of the multiple health benefits to use in your diet is for you, then these easy starter tips for a few of the more popular vegetables on the cruciferous list will help get you going.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a beautiful, oh-so-tasty and versatile vegetable. You can eat it raw in salads or simply steam and serve but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Roasted cauliflower has pleasant and firm “meaty” texture that’s sure to please. Use your stick blender to turn steamed cauliflower into a delicious substitute for a high-calorie cream sauce. Finely diced, and gently cooked it makes a brilliant and super healthy alternative to rice. One of my personal favorite ways to eat it is to make an instant pickle with vinegar, a few herbs and spices and sea salt. The crunch is amazing, and the taste is delicious!

If you’ve ever had the pleasure of eating a pizza made with crushed cauliflower as the base for the crust, you know it makes a deliciously enjoyable treat that’s bursting with flavor and nutrients. Let your regular pizza crust try and match that!

Brussels Sprouts

The often-maligned Brussel sprout (I’ve no idea why some people hate on this amazing veggie but, it’s their loss). One of my favorite ways to serve Brussel Sprouts is to oven roast them with olive oil, garlic and diced jalapeno (include seeds for more heat or eliminate for a mild background hum of spice. Sprinkle with sea salt and pop into a 400- degree oven till tender and caramelized. You can do the same on the stove top in a heavy frying pan. Toss with fresh grated parmesan to serve. Delicious.

Kale

Kale has long been recognized as a super food and we now consume in dishes from salads to smoothies and everything in between.  Kale is wonderful raw in salads (just remove the woody parts of the stem and fine dice the rest of it), especially when combined with a tasty salty-sweet dressing that compliments the slightly bitter taste.

One of my newer favorite snacks is kale chips. Tasty, salty, delicious and great for you.

Arugula

Arugula is another popular member of the cruciferous family. Spicy and bitter, once pureed it makes a great pesto but equally delicious raw on homemade pizza. A quick and delightful salad favorite of mine is fresh arugula tossed with equal amount of spinach with grated or cubed feta cheese and a simple balsamic vinegar dressing. Serve with a toasted crusty bread for a truly delicious power lunch.

Below is a list of some of the many popular cruciferous vegetables you can enjoy.

Chances are, you’re already enjoying several of these. If not, now is the perfect time to learn exactly why you should have a list of cruciferous vegetables in your fridge every day.

Broccoli Family

  • Broccoli
  • Broccoli sprouts
  • Cauliflower
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Green cabbage
  • Red cabbage

Leafy Greens

Dark, leafy greens also count in the brassica family:

  • Collard greens
  • Mustard greens
  • Kale
  • Bok choy
  • Swiss chard
  • Watercress

Root Vegetables

Some root vegetables also fall under the category of crucifers:

  • Turnips
  • Rutabaga
  • Radishes

 

 

What’s the Difference Between Fruits and Vegetables?

What’s the Difference Between Fruits and Vegetables?

For obvious reasons this site is focused on cruciferous vegetables but for interests’ sake, let’s step back a bit and take a wider look at the nutritional differences between fruits and vegetables.

Fruits and vegetables (especially cruciferous vegetables) are an important part of a healthy diet, but not everyone is aware of their differences. There’s plenty you need to know about which produce items rank highest for vitamins or minerals like fiber with each type having its own unique benefits depending on your needs!

When it comes to nutritional value, taste and textures, there are considerable differences between the two groups, but they all have their place.

Let’s examine the many differences between fruits and vegetables and what each has to offer you.

Fruits and Vegetables – Similar But Different

Fruits and veggies are identified from a scientific and culinary point of view.

Science classifies fruits and vegetables according to the part of the host plant they grow from.

Technically, fruits develop from the flower of the plant and most everything else is classed as a vegetable. There are exceptions to every rule of course. Certain “fruits” site in a bit of a grey area. A tomato for instance is a fruit by scientific definition but, we call it a vegetable because of its taste profile.

While fruits contain seeds, vegetables usually have roots, stems and leaves.

When it comes to cooking or eating, fruits and vegetables fall into classes based on their taste profile. Sweet or tart fruits most often used in desserts etc while vegetables often have a more mild, less sweet taste that can be used as a main course for dinner or compliments a main course.

Fruits Or Vegetables?

You probably have a pretty good concept of which foods are considered fruits and which are considered vegetables, at least in culinary terms.

As previously mentioned, certain “fruits” like tomatoes cross the boundaries at least as far as cooking goes but, tomatoes aren’t the only ones classed as a fruit because of their taste.

In the United States in 1893, the Supreme court passed a ruling based on its savory taste classifying the tomato as a vegetable for customs regulations. A fruit by technical definition but a vegetable by flavor.

Here’s a list of other “fruits” labelled as vegetables:

  • Winter squash
  • Avocados
  • Cucumbers
  • Peppers
  • Eggplants
  • Olives
  • Pumpkins
  • Pea pods
  • Zucchini

Vegetables With a Sweeter Flavor

There are one or two vegetables that partially cross over in the other direction. While they are still classed as vegetables, they most definitely have a sweeter profile that easily lends itself to use in desserts and baking.

The sweet potato is a good example. Synonymous with Thanksgiving in the United States, it’s a root vegetable that lends itself nicely to sweeter dishes. Same for carrots and even beets, rutabagas and turnips.

 

Fruits and Vegetables – What’s The Nutritional Comparison?

There are definite similarities between the nutritional value of fruits and vegetables.

They both contain high levels of dietary fiber and most have wonderful amounts of minerals, vitamins, antioxidants and nutritional compounds we need for good health.

All fruits and vegetables are low in fat and salt but because of the sweet taste, some fruits do contain higher amounts of natural sugar and calories.

For example, a single cup of apple has 65 calories and 13 grams of sugar as compared to a cup of broccoli which has 31 calories and just 2 grams of sugar.

If we look at fiber content, certain fruits contain higher levels than some vegetables. Some fruits run 2-15 grams of fiber per 100 grams whilst leafy green veggies contain only 1.2 – 4 grams fiber per 100grams.

All fruits and vegetables contain a lot of water. While most fruits contain are 61 – 89% water a vegetable like spinach runs 84 – 95%.

Different classes of fruits and vegetables offer a wide nutritional range. Here are just a few:

  • Tubers: high in fiber, vitamin C, beta-carotene, potassium and B vitamins
  • Citrus fruits: High in vitamin C, beta-carotene, folate and antioxidants that could offer protection against degenerative disease.
  • Cruciferous vegetables: Contain glucosinolates, a group of compounds that has been linked to the prevention of cancer. Generally high in fiber and nutritional value.
  • Berries: Full of anthocyanins, anti-inflammatory compounds that have been studied for their ability to reduce oxidative stress and promote heart health.
  • Leafy greens: A good source of carotenoids like lutein, which has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer.

Including a good mix of fruits and vegetables in your diet can ensure you’re getting a diverse range of nutrients.

Packing as many of these into your daily diet gives you a wide range of health benefits.

The Many Health Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables

There are literally textbooks worth of research and scientific study that list all the varied health benefits of fruits and vegetables.

For example, multiple research papers document the benefits of eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables that lowers your risk of developing heart disease.

One particular paper discovered three or more serving everyday lowered your risk of heart disease by as much a 70%.

Being far lower in calories but still high in fiber, both fruits and vegetables can help you if you desire to lose weight.

One long-term study from a major university found that over a 24-year time period, the 133,000 people followed tended to lose weight over time while consistently eating a fruit and vegetable based diet.

There’s a reason why the saying “you are what you eat” is so true. Fiber can help reduce your risk of certain cancers, like colorectal cancer which research has shown increases with low fiber intake and decreases when people consume more fruits or vegetables.

There is evidence that supports the theory of fruit and vegetable intake maintaining blood sugar levels. The fiber from these foods slow down how quickly sugars are absorbed, which can help keep your body steady by keeping levels stable or even lowering them slightly in some cases!

One particular study demonstrated a link between fruit and vegetable consumption and a lowered development of diabetes.

It should be noted that these results apply to fruits and vegetables but not fruit juice. While fresh fruit juice does contain a rich serving of nutrients and should be enjoyed regularly, in this form you miss out on the fiber and the health benefits it brings to the table.

Final Thoughts

We now know fruits and vegetables are different in structure, taste and nutritional value. Some fruits are vegetables and some vegetables have a sweeter taste but the most important take away is this. Eating a diet rich in a variety of fruits and vegetables is a health bonus for all of us.

Everyone should be eating many of them as we can daily. The tastes are amazing, you can literally do anything with them and they help us live a longer, healthier life.

Click Here To Read: What’s The Nutritional Value of Broccoli – One Cup Equals Excellent Nutrition

What Are Cruciferous Vegetables? – Here’s a List To Get You Started

What Are Cruciferous Vegetables? – Here’s a List To Get You Started

Spinach, arugula, broccoli and Brussels sprouts are all popular, delicious, versatile, nutrient-packed vegetables. Beyond that, there’s another common thread that ties them all together that you might not know anything about.

Those names plus many others are all on a list of vegetables known as cruciferous (see below for a full list of all cruciferous vegetables).

The name “cruciferous” comes from Latin meaning “cross bearing” because of their four petaled flower resembling an X on top or sideways.

Cruciferous vegetables certainly do not look similar. They come in a large variety of shapes, sizes, and colors. What they happen to have in common is being packed with minerals, vitamins and nutrients that have huge health benefits to those of us consuming them.

Nutrients such as folate Vitamin A, C and K are all present and available. The dark, leafy green vegetables also contain plant-based phytonutrients that are known to lower inflammation in our bodies and help protect us against certain types of cancer.

All cruciferous vegetables are high in fiber and low in calories. Winners all round.

A huge benefit of eating regular meals and snacks containing cruciferous vegetables is you don’t have to eat pounds and pounds of it to get the full benefits. Adults should be eating at least 2.5 cups of vegetables every day. For raw leafy greens such as spinach or kale, a 1.5 cup serving is equal to 1 cup of vegetables consumed whereas for measuring the harder members such as broccoli and cauliflower, one cup is a cup.

My suggestion based on real life is don’t get too carried away with the measurements. Just enjoy as much as you can every day. You’ll soon start to see and feel the benefits.

If putting more of the multiple health benefits to use in your diet is for you, then these easy starter tips for a few of the more popular vegetables on the cruciferous list will help get you going.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a beautiful, oh-so-tasty and versatile vegetable. You can eat it raw in salads or simply steam and serve but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Roasted cauliflower has pleasant and firm “meaty” texture that’s sure to please. Use your stick blender to turn steamed cauliflower into a delicious substitute for a high-calorie cream sauce. Finely diced, and gently cooked it makes a brilliant and super healthy alternative to rice. One of my personal favorite ways to eat it is to make an instant pickle with vinegar, a few herbs and spices and sea salt. The crunch is amazing, and the taste is delicious!

If you’ve ever had the pleasure of eating a pizza made with crushed cauliflower as the base for the crust, you know it makes a deliciously enjoyable treat that’s bursting with flavor and nutrients. Let your regular pizza crust try and match that!

Brussels Sprouts

The often-maligned Brussel sprout (I’ve no idea why some people hate on this amazing veggie but, it’s their loss). One of my favorite ways to serve Brussel Sprouts is to oven roast them with olive oil, garlic and diced jalapeno (include seeds for more heat or eliminate for a mild background hum of spice. Sprinkle with sea salt and pop into a 400- degree oven till tender and caramelized. You can do the same on the stove top in a heavy frying pan. Toss with fresh grated parmesan to serve. Delicious.

Kale

Kale has long been recognized as a super food and we now consume in dishes from salads to smoothies and everything in between.  Kale is wonderful raw in salads (just remove the woody parts of the stem and fine dice the rest of it), especially when combined with a tasty salty-sweet dressing that compliments the slightly bitter taste.

One of my newer favorite snacks is kale chips. Tasty, salty, delicious and great for you.

Arugula

Arugula is another popular member of the cruciferous family. Spicy and bitter, once pureed it makes a great pesto but equally delicious raw on homemade pizza. A quick and delightful salad favorite of mine is fresh arugula tossed with equal amount of spinach with grated or cubed feta cheese and a simple balsamic vinegar dressing. Serve with a toasted crusty bread for a truly delicious power lunch.

Below is a list of some of the many popular cruciferous vegetables you can enjoy.

Chances are, you’re already enjoying several of these. If not, now is the perfect time to learn exactly why you should have a list of cruciferous vegetables in your fridge every day.

Broccoli Family

  • Broccoli
  • Broccoli sprouts
  • Cauliflower
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Green cabbage
  • Red cabbage

Leafy Greens

Dark, leafy greens also count in the brassica family:

  • Collard greens
  • Mustard greens
  • Kale
  • Bok choy
  • Swiss chard
  • Watercress

Root Vegetables

Some root vegetables also fall under the category of crucifers:

  • Turnips
  • Rutabaga
  • Radishes